John Boik, in the first of three articles on his recent work, absolutely nails .

Our excerpt:

“No matter how promising the design of a new system might be, it would be unreasonable to expect that a nation would abruptly drop an existing system in favor of a new one. Nevertheless, a viable, even attractive strategy exists by which new systems could be successfully researched, developed, tested, and implemented. I call it engage global, test local, spread viral.

Engage global means to engage the global academic community and technical sector, in partnership with other segments of society, in a well-defined R&D program aimed at computer simulation and scientific field testing of new systems and benchmarking of results. In this way, the most profound insights of science can be brought into play.

Test local means to scientifically test new designs at the local (e.g., city or community) level, using volunteers (individuals, businesses, non-profits, etc.) organized as civic clubs. This approach allows testing by relatively small teams, at relatively low cost and risk, in coexistence with existing systems, and without legislative action.

Spread viral means that if a system shows clear benefits in one location (elimination of poverty, for example, more meaningful jobs, or less crime) it would likely spread horizontally, even virally, to other local areas. This approach would create a global network of communities and cities that cooperate in trade, education, the setup of new systems, and other matters. Over time, its impact on all segments of society would grow.

Cities, big and small, are the legs upon which all national systems rest. Already cities and their communities are hubs for innovation. With some further encouragement and support, and the right tools and programs, they could become more resilient and robust, and bigger heroes in the coming great transition.”

Photo by Occupy Global

1 Comment The Triarchy of Cosmo-Localization: Engage Global, Test Local, Spread Viral

  1. Alain

    Dear Michel,
    Well formulated?. For the ´spread viral’, it should be clear that it is not about selecting best practices and disseminate them, even worse, willing scaling them up. In complex systems, best practices do not work, only sharing practices and multiplying interconnections.
    Then, comes a skill where humans are still better at than computers: pattern recognition.
    Amicalement,
    A

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