P2P Foundation's blog

Researching, documenting and promoting peer to peer practices


    Sites/Publications


    Bookmarks

    More in Diigo »

    Books


    Free Software, Free Society

    Community


Admin


Featured Book

“Stop, Thief!” – Peter Linebaugh's New Collection of Essays


Open Calls


Mailing List

Subscribe

Translate

  • Recent Comments:

    • Elias Crim: Brilliant, timely and much needed. I do hope this letter will draw a good deal of attention!

    • Keith: Re-posted and shared https://medium.com/p/ca78e03a9 664

    • John Medaille: This is no more than a call to the Church to return to the role it had before the State displaced the Church in the regulation of...

    • Eimhin: “…projecting on to the English riots of 2011 a political motivation that simply wasn’t there.” I want to comment on this...

    • Ellie Kesselman: I retract every bad thought I’ve had about the P2P Foundation, most recently about some of the more Blue Sky aspects of...

Solitude and connectivity

photo of Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens
16th February 2009


If boredom is the great emotion of the TV generation, loneliness is the great emotion of the Web generation. We lost the ability to be still, our capacity for idleness. They have lost the ability to be alone, their capacity for solitude.

Important excerpt from a thoughtfull essay that argues that ubiquitous connectivity may be destroying “positive solitude“. The article is well worth reading and grounds the concept of solitude historically.

Here’s the key insight, from WILLIAM DERESIEWICZ in the Chronicle Review:

“What does the contemporary self want? The camera has created a culture of celebrity; the computer is creating a culture of connectivity. As the two technologies converge — broadband tipping the Web from text to image, social-networking sites spreading the mesh of interconnection ever wider — the two cultures betray a common impulse. Celebrity and connectivity are both ways of becoming known. This is what the contemporary self wants. It wants to be recognized, wants to be connected: It wants to be visible. If not to the millions, on Survivor or Oprah, then to the hundreds, on Twitter or Facebook. This is the quality that validates us, this is how we become real to ourselves — by being seen by others. The great contemporary terror is anonymity. If Lionel Trilling was right, if the property that grounded the self, in Romanticism, was sincerity, and in modernism it was authenticity, then in postmodernism it is visibility.”

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>