P2P Foundation's blog

Researching, documenting and promoting peer to peer practices


    Sites/Publications


    Bookmarks

    More in Diigo »

    Books


    Free Software, Free Society

    Community


Admin


Featured Book

“Stop, Thief!” – Peter Linebaugh's New Collection of Essays


Open Calls


Mailing List

Subscribe

Translate

  • Recent Comments:

    • Ellie Kesselman: I retract every bad thought I’ve had about the P2P Foundation, most recently about some of the more Blue Sky aspects of...

    • Frédéric Sultan: Dear Michel, This texte is not the result of discussions by the group of people mentionned. It is a manifesto elaborated and...

    • Michel Bauwens: do you have any data or sources to underpin such serious accusations ?

    • Joe L. Jordan: UBER is a bunch of crooks running a racket. Their insurance is bogus and has never paid off on a single claim. Drivers are canned...

    • @mikeriddell62: A universally accepted IOU that is earned into existence for protecting the common good, would counter-balance the wasteful...

Distinguishing Open Access from Open Process

photo of Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens
29th January 2006


We published a number of references in order to arrive at a more precise definition of open knowledge and its various aspects, see the entry here, inspired by the work of the Open Knowledge Foundation.
Here is a valuable refining by ben vershbow in the Future of the Book blog, on the occasion of the MIT conference on The Economics of Open Content:

“I heard that there are two kinds of “open.” Open as in open access — to knowledge, archives, medical information etc. (like Public Library of Science or Project Gutenberg). And open as in open process — work that is out in the open, open to input, even open-ended (like Linux, Wikipedia or our experiment with MItch Stephens, Without Gods).

I heard that “content” is actually a demeaning term, treating works of authorship as filler for slots — a commodity as opposed to a public good.

I heard that open content is not necessarily the same as free content. Both can be part of a business model, but the defining difference is control — open content is often still controlled content.

I heard that for “open” to win real user investment that will feedback innovation and even result in profit, it has to be really open, not sort of open. Otherwise “open” will always be a burden.

I heard that if you build the open-access resources and demonstrate their value, the money will come later.

I heard that content should be given away for free and that the money is to be made talking about the content.

I heard that reputation and an audience are the most valuable currency anyway.”

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>