P2P Foundation

Researching, documenting and promoting peer to peer practices


Featured Book

The Transforming History of Land Ownership


Book Store



Admin

Subscribe

Translate

Chris Steward on why we need Anti-Heroic Leadership

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
1st August 2014


Excerpted from Chris C Stewart:

“My mate Richard Wilson has just launched his new free eBook “Anti Hero” – pitched at institutionalising transformational personal development in our collective leadership. Focused on change in the UK, I think the logic and insights are relevant globally, but especially in industrialised countries.

These para’s from the summary nail the key points I think:

“Anti Hero argues that the modern challenges we face have fundamentally changed what we need from our leaders, requiring a shift from Heroic to Antiheroic leadership. The Heroic leaders who dominate our institutions today have four fatal flaws. First, they tend to be over-confident in their opinions. Secondly, they tend to lack empathy towards others. Thirdly, they tend to be inflexible. And finally, they tend to deny the existence of uncertainty. These are the four pillars of the Heroic leader. This isn’t, though, the fault of the leaders themselves; most of our leaders are the victims of outdated systems of leadership that were built for simpler times. Indeed, our leaders are very often doing their best in very difficult circumstances.

Many of today’s issues are not like the complicated technical problems of the past; problems that could be addressed by smart… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: P2P Governance, P2P Hierarchy Theory, P2P Subjectivity |

P2P Trendfest (8): Context-Based Sustainability (metrics for the commons ?)

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
1st August 2014


“My sense is that the commons movement could benefit from deeper engagement with the corporate community, including activists who advocate for corporations to take full accountability for their impacts on capitals that are vital to stakeholder well-being. And I know that the sustainability context movement would benefit from expanding its advocacy base beyond the core of the corporate accountability community.”

Excerpted from Bill Baue:

“CBS is focused on measuring, managing and reporting sustainability performance at the organizational level — primarily, corporations. And CBS is rooted in capital theory, or the idea of multiple areas of capital stocks (natural, human, social, constructed and financial) that yield flows that ideally are harnessed for human well-being and managed to sustainably preserve their so-called carrying capacity. Of course, many (if not most) of these capital stocks are based in the commons as resources shared jointly by diverse individuals and entities.

My sense is that the commons movement could benefit from deeper engagement with the corporate community, including activists who advocate for corporations to take full accountability for their impacts on capitals that are vital to stakeholder well-being. And I know that the sustainability context movement would benefit from expanding its advocacy base beyond the core… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Commons, Featured Trend, P2P Ecology |

Essay: Towards a Participatory Market Society

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
31st July 2014


* Article: Economics 2.0: The Natural Step towards A Self-Regulating, Participatory Market Society. Dirk Helbing.

From the Abstract:

“Despite all our great advances in science, technology and financial innovations, many soci- eties today are struggling with a financial, economic and public spending crisis, over-regulation, and mass unemployment, as well as lack of sustainability and innovation. Can we still rely on conventional economic thinking or do we need a new approach? Is our economic system under- going a fundamental transformation? Are our theories still doing a good job with just a few exceptions, or do they work only for “good weather” but not for “market storms”? Can we fix existing theories by adapting them a bit, or do we need a fundamentally different approach? These are the kind of questions that will be addressed in this paper. I argue that, as the complexity of socio-economic systems increases, networked decision- making and bottom-up self-regulation will be more and more important features. It will be explained why, besides the “homo economicus” with strictly self-regarding preferences, natural selection has also created a “homo socialis” with other-regarding preferences. While the “homo economicus” optimizes the own prospects in separation, the decisions of the “homo socialis” are… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Ethical Economy, Featured Essay |

P2P Trendfest (7): Mutual Development

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
31st July 2014


Jay Cousins explains the new p2p-driven model of development:

“There are “no experts”, we are all equal participants

Everyone should benefit

Share your ideas, skills, knowledge and resources with others

Seize the opportunity to challenge your prejudices, engage with empathy, listen without judgement, seek to learn

Do not look for funding, instead communicate your actual needs with clarity

Be prepared to be surprised

Look to build long term relationships that sustain themselves.

Mutual Development arises from observations as to the state of the Development Industry and the problems it causes. Especially with respect to Money and it’s use in social empowerment. Short summary – Money fucks up everything in this context, at least when coming from external and non sustainable resources. Money creates artificial inequality, without guaranteeing meaningful contribution. It creates dependencies, with inevitably lead to collapse or hindrance to projects upon the withdrawal of funds. Anyway, enough bitching, I’m trying to create a positive provocation. “Experts” are also problematic, I addressed this in the first post.

As well as a provocation towards development I also consider this a provocation towards tourism (at least with respect to a desire to experience different cultures), gentrification and other issues that also suffer from inequal relationships and an absence of… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Collective Intelligence, Featured Trend, Open Models, P2P Development |

Limiting Noise

photo of Øyvind Holmstad
Øyvind Holmstad
31st July 2014


Excerpt from Charles Siegel’s book Unplanning, chapter 7. I strongly recommend to visit Siegel’s Preservation Institute for reading free e-books and other resources.

Noise is another telling example of the failure of growth. All through the nineteenth and twentieth century, the middle class tried to move to quieter neighborhoods by moving to lower density suburbs. Until World War I, they succeeded: from the walking city to the streetcar suburb, middle-class neighborhoods did become pleasanter and quieter. But during the twentieth century, so many new sources of noise appeared that modern suburbia is noisier than the much denser streetcar suburbs were one hundred years ago.

It should be obvious by now that the only way to reduce noise is by limiting its sources.

For example, cities and suburbs could cut their noise levels significantly by banning gasoline-powered gardening equipment. Electric edgers and electric chain saws work just as well, and there are always electrical outlets within reach on urban or suburban lots; there are also rechargeable battery-powered lawn mowers available. Some cities already have banned gasoline powered leaf blowers, because people refuse to put up… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: P2P Architecture and Urbanism |

P2P Trendfest (6): User-Generated Urbanism

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
30th July 2014


Jordan Kushins refers to three different models:

“The traditional model of city-making has historically involved experts with a definitive, long-term plan executed over time. The issue with that is that culture changes faster than infrastructure; we’ve surpassed our ability to keep up. One of the consequences is that we’re left living in cities we planned 50 to 60 years ago.”

That’s Blaine Merker. He’s a principal and one of the co-founders of Rebar, an art and design studio in San Francisco set on evolving the way people interact and engage with their environment. He and his team are the co-founders of Adaptive Metropolis, an upcoming symposium focusing on a new wave of grassroots urbanism that addresses the needs of places and constituents—immediately. By the people, for the people. Merker calls it “user-generated urbanism,” or “collaborative city-making.” But what, exactly, does that mean?

These ideas may be formed within traditional disciplines—architecture, engineering, landscape, design—but are adapted and promoted by locals who are most familiar with the problems and issues facing their areas. Merker describes three models:

* Open Source

Merker points to Park(ing) Day as a prime example of “open source” urbanism. In 2005, the Rebar gang put two hours worth of coins in… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Featured Trend, P2P Architecture and Urbanism |

Book of the Day: The Transforming History of Land Ownership

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
30th July 2014


* Book: Owning the Earth: The Transforming History of Land Ownership. By Andro Linklater. Bloomsbury, 2013.

From a review by David Bollier:

“the new book .. describes how the Pilgrims imposed their notions of private property on the land commons in the New World. The consequences – while perhaps inevitable, whether from them or other settlers – were nonetheless pivotal in the future development of America.

In 1623, William Bradford, the future governor of the colony, declared that land would be privately owned and managed, with each family assigned a parcel of land “according to the proportion of their number.” This decision had profound effects on how individual Pilgrims managed their land and related to each other.

As Bradford wrote: ‘‘And no man now thought he could live except he had catle and a great deale of ground to keep them all, all striving to increase their stocks. By which means they were scattered all over the bay quickly and the towne in which they lived compactly till now was left very thinne.’’ You might say that private property rights in land were the beginning of suburban sprawl.

Linklater points out that the native people, the Wampanaog, had allowed individual parcels of… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Commons, Featured Book, Peer Property |

Colombian Student Faces Prison Charges for Sharing an Academic Article Online

photo of Kevin Flanagan
Kevin Flanagan
30th July 2014


From EFF DeepLinks Blog

In many parts of the developing world, students face barriers to access academic materials. Libraries are often inadequate, and schools and universities are often unable to pay dues for expensive, specialized databases. For these students, the Internet is a vital tool and resource to access materials that are otherwise unavailable to them. Yet despite the opportunities enabled by the Internet, there are still major risks to accessing and sharing academic resources online.

A current situation in Colombia exemplifies this problem: a graduate student is facing four to eight years in prison for sharing an academic article on the Internet. He wasn’t making a personal profit from sharing the article—he simply intended for other scientists like him to be able to access and cite this scientific research.

Diego Gomez, 26, is a Master’s student who has been researching biodiversity and working on the conservation of reptiles and amphibians for several years in the South American region. Throughout his young career, the biggest obstacle he faced was in accessing academic resources that existed on global research databases. As a student at a small university in Armenia, the availability of research papers… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Campaigns, Open Access, P2P Education |

P2P Trendfest (5): Social Recession

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
29th July 2014


Excerpted from Charles Hugh Smith:

“Social recession is my term for the social and cultural consequences of a permanently recessionary economy such as that of Japan—and now, Europe and the U.S.

Forget Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measure of expansion (“growth”) or recession—what really matters is the social recession, which continues to deepen in America.

The term social recession has two distinct meanings: around 2000, the term was used to describe the erosion of social cohesion via the decline of institutions such as marriage and the rise of social problems such as teen pregnancy.

Many commentators pinned the responsibility for this erosion of social constraints and bonds on rampant individualism and overstimulated consumerism, while others pointed to urbanization, the commodification of child care, women entering the workforce en masse and similar trends. Poverty was explicitly rejected as a causal factor, hence the term “social recession.”

This notion of social recession was aptly described by Robert E. Lane, author of the 2001 book The Loss of Happiness in Market Democracies:

There is a kind of famine of warm interpersonal relations, of easy-to-reach neighbors, of encircling, inclusive memberships, and of solidary family life… For people lacking in social support of this kind, unemployment has more… Continue reading »

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Economy and Business, Featured Trend |

Essay: Grassroots Sustainable Community-Based Enterprise in India

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
29th July 2014


* Article: Jasmine growers of coastal Karnataka: Grassroots Sustainable Community-Based Enterprise in India. Entrepreneurship & Regional Development: An International Journal. Volume 23, Issue 5-6, 2011. Special Issue: Community-Based, Social & Societal Entrepreneurship

From the Abstract:

“The case of the jasmine flower growers in coastal Karnataka is an example of a local successful grassroots enterprise that has proved robust for over 70 years. The aim of this research is to examine the history, mechanisms, interconnectedness, and success of the jasmine growing program in coastal Karnataka and assess its compatibility with the community-based enterprise (CBE) model as proposed by Peredo and Chrisman . We found that the existence of a natural, autonomously developed CBE without ‘western’ intervention can help to fine tune our knowledge of sustainable CBE and assist in helping practitioners learn what works and what does not when proposing a CBE.”

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditShare

Conversation: Add your Comment »

Posted in: Featured Essay |