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From Copyleft to Copyfarleft: The need for a Commons-Based Reciprocity License

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Stacco Troncoso
28th January 2015


Reposted from our sister-site Commons Transition. The title of this post is an homage to Primavera de Filippi’s and Miguel Said de Viera’s excellent essay on the subject.


Commons Based Reciprocity Licenses (CBRLs or “CopyFair” licenses) are specifically designed to find a middle ground between the full-sharing Copyleft licenses, such as the GPL, the Non-Commercial licenses, such as those offered by Creative Commons, and the copyright regime which privatises knowledge. CBRLs will provide for the free use and unimpeded commercialization of licensed material within the Commons while resisting its non-reciprocal appropriation by for-profit driven entities, unless those entities contribute to the Commons by way of licensing fees or other means. Our intention is to stimulate wealth circulation within the Commons and strengthen the resilience of P2P as a proto-mode of production with a constructive, rather than extractive, relationship with the corporate sector. Apart from their practical use as off-the-shelf licenses, CBRLs will also highlight the precise interaction between the Commons and the new ethical market sectors, whilst supporting the emergence of… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Collective Intelligence, Commons, Commons Transition, Culture & Ideas, Economy and Business, Ethical Economy, Original Content, P2P Development, P2P Foundation, Peer Production, Peer Property |

Essay of the Day: Free Software and the Law

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Michel Bauwens
28th January 2015


* Article: Free software and the law. Out of the frying pan and into the fire: how shaking up intellectual property suits competition just fine. By Angela Daly. Journal of Peer Production, Issue 3, July 2013

From the Abstract:

“Free software is viewed as a revolutionary and subversive practice, and in particular has dealt a strong blow to the traditional conception of intellectual property law (although in its current form could be considered a ‘hack’ of IP rights). However, other (capitalist) areas of law have been swift to embrace free software, or at least incorporate it into its own tenets. One area in particular is that of competition (antitrust) law, which itself has long been in theoretical conflict with intellectual property, due to the restriction on competition inherent in the grant of ‘monopoly’ rights by copyrights, patents and trademarks. This contribution will examine how competition law has approached free software by examining instances in which courts have had to deal with such initiatives, for instance in the Oracle Sun Systems merger, and the implications that these decisions have on free software initiatives. The presence or absence of corporate involvement in initiatives will be an important factor in this investigation, with… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Copyright/IP, Featured Essay, Free Software, P2P Legal Dev. |

2nd #FLOSS4P2P Workshop Call for Proposals

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chris pinchen
28th January 2015


process

The Call for Proposals and registration for the 2nd FLOSS4P2P workshop are now open.

The two day workshop which aims to gather the FLOSS projects that are building software for peer production and organization, with a focus on distributed ones, will take place on March 16th & 17th at Fab Lab London.

It is free to attend but registration is necessary and there are some scholarships available.

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

We welcome proposals for:

  • Lightning talks (2m-5m): summarise your idea & receive feedback

  • Show & Tell presentations (20m): explain your project/tech/research

  • Tutorials on software tools (1h)

Please email: lu.yang@surrey.ac.uk with your proposals by 28 February 2015

 

SCHOLARSHIPS

There are a few scholarships for potential participants who wish to attend the event. The scholarship will cover the participant travel and subsistence cost up to €400. If you are interested in applying for the scholarship, please email: lu.yang@surrey.ac.uk by 28 February 2015. with a paragraph stating why you think your FLOSS is relevant, plus a short bio. Prioritiy will be given to low resources, innovative FLOSS within the topics of the call, and being a grassroot community.

DETAILS

WHAT:

A two day workshop… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Default |

De-Colonizing Ourselves So We Can Help Others

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lisha sterling
28th January 2015


Back in September I wrote a post for A Sense of Place, one of the blogs in the Pagan channel at Patheos, that felt particularly appropriate for the P2P Foundation community. At Stacco Troncoso’s invitation, I share that post with you here.


Today I read an article that made me steaming mad. It was predictable that it would upset me. My co-worker shared it with me telling me how much it angered her. Of course, I had to look. The article was all about how we need to stop encouraging people in less developed countries to be entrepreneurs and teach them instead to be factory workers. Because profit. The argument was that entrepreneurs in developing countries aren’t going to make that much money if they just serve the other poor people in their village, and that real economic progress can only come with economies of… Continue reading »

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Posted in: P2P Spirituality |

Why Deflation is the Endgame, Conceptually Explained

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Øyvind Holmstad
27th January 2015


By Eivind Berge. Original article here.
-

To intuitively understand why deflation is the endgame of our civilization, divide people into miners and everyone else. The miners are everyone in the business of extracting nonrenewable resources, such as oil and metals. Miners are indisputably subject to diminishing returns as we consume the highest ore grades first, which means rising inefficiency and increased costs for every unit produced. Therefore, to keep civilization running, society must allocate increasing amounts of resources to the miners at the expense of everyone else. In other words, we get poorer, and poorer people are able to pay less, rather than more, for commodities. As natural resources get depleted, it therefore follows from the law of supply and demand that commodity prices will go down, rather than up as is commonly and erroneously assumed. Perhaps this becomes clearer if “demand” is understood as “affordability,” without which there can be no demand. As their income falls below costs of production, miners will be forced out of business and the necessities of life will no longer be available to humanity. Some people imagine that they can “save” for this eventuality by hoarding gold or whatever, but… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Guest Post, P2P Energy |

The opportunity in Greece

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Michel Bauwens
27th January 2015


The Greek people must be thanked for putting the need for changing the course of economic policies firmly on the European agenda. The stakes are high. A failure in Greece will be seen as vindication of austerity as the only option. It will have negative repercussions for any progressive alternative throughout Europe. Those convinced that Europe needs to change cannot sit on the fence, but need to engage in support of the new winds of reform.

A text by Maria Helena dos Santos André, Director of the ILO Bureau for Workers’ Activities and a former Minister of Labour of Portugal

“In a time when in Paris Marine Le Pen is “Ante Portas”, when xenophobic populists are marching through the streets of Dresden, when in London the UKIP sets the tone for an ever more Anti-European hysteria, and when in Helsinki the Finnish government becomes the most ardent proponent of more austerity for Greece, for no other reason but the fear of a success of the “real Finns” at the next ballot box, the Greek people have given a clear signal, voting against more austerity and for the European values of democracy, the welfare state, tolerance and inclusive societies.

They… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Economy and Business, P2P Labor, Politics |

Book of the Day: eGaia by Gary Alexander

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Guy James
27th January 2015


eGaia by Gary AlexanderI was fortunate enough to meet Gary Alexander, a New Yorker living in East Anglia, UK, at the Open Everything meetup in Cloughjordan, Ireland in the autumn of last year (2014) and was party to the discussion of some of the ideas contained in this book, although with all that was going on we didn’t have too much time to get into them in any depth. However his book sounds very interesting; my mammoth reading list means I haven’t had time to read it yet but I present it as something which may be interesting to the P2P community.

A short summary by Keith Parkins of the basic economic structure proposed in the book:

“In eGaia, three interlocking economies described

– local co-operative
– regional
– global

Within the local economy, everything is on a sharing basis, no money, people are expected to keep in balance,and contribute their fair share. It goes one stage further than granting a Basic Income.

For what the local economy cannot supply, will source from either regional or global economy, for which a financial exchange takes place, using a… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Featured Book, P2P Books |

Commoners in Transition: Janice Figueiredo

photo of Stacco Troncoso
Stacco Troncoso
27th January 2015


Reposted from our new Commons Transition web platform “Commoners in Transition” features exclusive global-P2P oriented interviews with people working on similar subjects, worldwide.


Our News and Articles section features interviews and articles involving Commoners in Transition, or, individuals and teams working together towards increasing the viability of the commons. Here, we present an interview with Janice Figueiredo, who was part of the FLOKSociety project launched in Ecuador. Janice spoke to us about her own experience collaborating with and learning from the indigenous people of the region.

Street

What is your background, and how did you get involved in the project in Ecuador?

I am a Brazilian citizen who has lived abroad for about 20 years, both in the United States and in Europe (Paris, France). I worked at the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) as IT project manager until 2009, when I decided to radically change my life and started placing my actions, work and studies in areas that, in my understanding, have the potential to genuinely transform the world into a more inclusive and fairer place. I directed my interests to researching the fields of collective intelligence, collaborative movements, P2P… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Activism, Commons, Commons Transition, Culture & Ideas, Gift Economies, Original Content, P2P Lifestyles, P2P Subjectivity |

Book of the Day: Sociofobia

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hartsellml
26th January 2015


Book: Sociofobia, El cambio político. César Rendueles

Link: Sociofobia

 

Description

Geert Lovink:

“At a conference in Barcelona in June 2014 I ran into Madrid-based critic César Rendueles who told me about the success of his book Sociofobia, El cambio político en la era de la utopia digital in the Spanish speaking world, published late 2013. On the cover it reads: “the ideology of the network has generated a diminished social reality.” Rendueles (b. 1975) used to work for the cultural organization Círculo de Bellas Artes and now teaches at Complutense University, Madrid. I would characterize Rendueles’ approach as that of a straight forward academic, without the customary doubt, double meanings and postmodern cynicism, amplified by a clear populist-left set of demands (inspired by Latin-America) to re-nationalize public infrastructure, in this case the mix of telecom, knowledge production, education and media. This southern European variety of “cybersocialism” stands in contrast to the Blairist “third way” that originated in northwestern Europe and accepted limited state intervention in economic ownership. It is also distinct from a “commons” approach, where the commons are governed by an undefined coalition of “stakeholders” in which the real power of both monopoly corporate players and the state is obscured. Instead,… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Featured Book, P2P Subjectivity |

The graph that everyone should see: the p2p revolution is real and exponential

photo of Michel Bauwens
Michel Bauwens
26th January 2015


It is not always easy to objectify the reality of the p2p transition.

On the cultural front, we can point to the change in attitudes documented by the Edelman Peer Trust Barometer, which between the years 2003 and 2007 saw a radical shift from trust in institutions to trust in ‘people like me’.

On the economic level, we can cite the Fair Use report, which calculates that already one sixth of U.S. GDP activities relied on shared knowledge, i.e. fair use exceptions to copyright law, involving an estimated 17 million workers.

What is happening objectively in the civic sphere is harder to determine, but here is a very interesting graph from commons researcher Tine de Moor in a study entitled “Homo Cooperans”, which only counts formal civic initiatives, so not even counting the informal communities that are at the heart of peer production itself. It basically shows the start and exponential rise of civic initiatives starting about ten years ago in 2004, a deceleration in 2008 due to the shock of the crisis, and a new exponential update shortly after.

These and other data are cited in an article by Dutch transition researcher Jan Rotmans, who stresses that these… Continue reading »

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Posted in: Default, P2P Collaboration, P2P Movements |